Jyotish from India

	╔═════════╤═════════╤═════════╤═════════╗
	║Ven      │SUN      │Mer      │Ket      ║
	║         │         │         │         ║
	║         │         │         │         ║
	║         │         │         │         ║
	╟─────────┼─────────┴─────────┼─────────╢
	║         │Lord Rama          │ASC      ║
	║         │                   │MON      ║
	║         │                   │Jup      ║
	║         │                   │         ║
	╟─────────┤                   ├─────────╢
	║Mar      │                   │         ║
	║         │                   │         ║
	║         │                   │         ║
	║         │                   │         ║
	╟─────────┼─────────┬─────────┼─────────╢
	║Rah      │         │Sat      │         ║
	║         │         │         │         ║
	║         │         │         │         ║
	║         │         │         │         ║
	╚═════════╧═════════╧═════════╧═════════╝

I first became interested in astrology — as an adult — in 1986. A very lovely Korean animator named Hyun Sook Cho showed me the Four Pillars Chinese style astrology while we were taking a break from drawing “He-Man and the Masters of the Universe.” at Filmation Studios in Reseda, California.

Little did I know that another form of astrology, one very different from the standard Western astrology that the newspaper articles mention in the sun-sign columns, made its own American debut that same year. 1986 was the year that James Braha published his ground-breaking work: “Ancient Hindu Astrology for the Modern Western Astrologer.” By the time 1993 rolled around I had exhausted the available literature on Chinese astrology; the inquiring astrological mind (mine) needed something new to chew on. I found two “new” continents to explore at the same time: Project Hindsight, and Hindu astrology, or Jyotish.

(In fact, it was Mr. Braha’s endorsement of Project Hindsight in an issue of the Mountain Astrologer magazine that convinced me to attend the only Project Hindsight seminar on the West Coast to date: “Ancient Lights in a Modern Sky.”)

To a modern person interested in astrology who is used to reading that “Cancers are Sensitive” and “Scorpios are Sexy,” Jyotish seems very strange indeed. The charts are not round, they’re square. More often than not, you don’t see Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, or Chiron anywhere. As often as not, you won’t even see the degrees of the planets mentioned. The Nodes of the Moon, Rahu and Ketu, are given almost the same significance as planets.

Many people don’t know that there is more than one kind of zodiac. Western astrology uses a zodiac where the signs are located in the sky according to the seasons. Jyotish uses a zodiac where the signs are located in the sky according to certain marker stars. Those two zodiacs perfectly overlap each other only once every 25960 years. As of this writing, the Tropical zodiac used by the Ancient Greeks and in the West since 160 B.C.E. and the most-used zodiac in Jyotish are mis-aligned to each other by over 24 degrees. I was born in 1955. According to the Tropical zodiac, the zodiac used in the West since the Greek astronomer Hipparchus, the Sun was located at 22 Cancer 47 when I was born. According to the Sidereal zodiac most used in Jyotish, the Sun was located at 29 GEMINI 32.

Both of these zodiacs, and the astrologies that go along with them, work very well — very well, indeed.

There remains a great debate as to which zodiac is the “right” one. I have philosophical reasons for asserting that both of them are correct.

Jyotish is a venerable system of astrology, one that excels in predicting events. I refuse to read for a client without having it at hand.

Ko Hashiguchi • 425-919-2169 • Ko@asianastro.com